Gucci Took Westminster Abbey

Gucci Took Westminster Abbey

PHOTO COURTESY: TOM JAMIESON FOR THE NEY WORK TIMES

For the past few weeks, England has already hosted not one, but two cruise fashion shows for European major brands. After Dior and its’ Dior Express sensation, Gucci’s showcase on 2nd June caused even bigger sensation. Ever since the venue was announced, it has been steering a lot of buzz, and how can it not? By showcasing their collection in Westminster Abbey, it makes Gucci the first brand that is able to do so.

So how did the brand compensate the sacred nature of Westminster Abbey?

PHOTO COURTESY: TOM JAMIESON FOR THE NEY WORK TIMES

Regarding on the choice of venue, the creative director of Gucci, Alessandro Michel told New York Times at backstage post-show “I love the English aesthetic — in a way I feel like it is close to my own language, a beautiful chaos”. He also called the country as “a box of treasures.”  As for the collection, he admit to take most of its inspiration from British culture. “It is a powerful mix of the past and the present,” he said. “The English, they love their culture, they celebrate it, in every last detail, and if they go against it, it’s punk.”

Despite the traditional venue, Gucci’s take on this collection is more on the experimental side. The house absorbed influence from punks, Scots, Victorian ladies and pack it altogether with retro, nerdish vibe. The result was a range of clothes that are heavily-patterned, colored, embellished, accessorized, and heavily adorned with practically…everything. Other than that, the collection also featured playful details like cats and dogs pattern which practically stole the show.


PHOTO COURTESY: TOM JAMIESON FOR THE NEY WORK TIMES

However, while the show-goers seem to be in an awe of the collection—like Elle Fanning who were reportedly ‘obsessed’ with the whole set—the use of the abbey stirs some controversies. Some of it comes from Religious figures such as the Rev. Peter Owen-Jones, an author and the vicar of Firle, Glynde and Beddingham. He voiced his disagreement via The Independent, a British newspaper. “Is the central icon of Christianity there to offer spiritual sustenance and love or is it just part of the marketplace of capitalism?” he argued. Indeed, this objection has its own reasons. Westminster Abbey is a symbol of the country’s history, and dismissing its sanctity for a show can potentially violate 700 years of valuable tradition.

 As other rule-breaking moves would, the Gucci cruise naturally spurs discussion. However, the verdict is, it was a brave move to juxtapose something as sacred as Westminster Abbey with something as contemporary as a fashion show (with various internet-inspired pieces in it).

 

Via: WWD, New York Times, Refinery 29

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